AAAAHH. I love this commercial so much.

The cynical part of me says that Cheerios did this for publicity, because, as part of a multinational corporation, there is no way they were unaware of the existence of racist morons. My self-berating side says that, since my family has faced substantially less discrimination than a lot of others in a similar boat, I'm just riding the wave of someone else's righteous indignation. Call it sufferjacking.

But I'm going to tell both of those parts of my brain to simmer down, because I want to love this, and I'm going to. First of all, it's a really adorable and clever commercial. Second of all, I get excited when I see mixed-race couples, still, to this day. I can't help myself. Every time I see them I want to just give them the space to be a couple, a bad one or a good one with people who are right or wrong for each other, but that impulse is met with my desire to give them a solid high-five. I usually compromise by doing nothing, except grinning to myself a little bit. (Apparently I'm not the only one who feels this way.)

As previously noted, above and elsewhere, my parents (if you're new here: Vietnamese dad, white [Western European] mom) have dealt with a lot less than they could have, usually because people can't place my father immediately. Horribly but also hilariously, a lot of the things people say to him in Appalachia are the result of them thinking that he's Mexican, which is really confusing in terms of what to get mad about. But "less," of course, is not "none." Also, I think about this perhaps more than other people because eventually I'll be in an interracial marriage by default, unless I somehow manage to meet another person who is half White, 7/16 Vietnamese, and 1/16 Chinese. 

Also, Cheerios had to DISABLE THE COMMENTS BECAUSE THEY WERE SO HORRIBLE. So I guess as long as that's a thing, we still need media like this, and I'm still going to let myself high-five General Mills for it.


(Also, this is a good point for a useful side note, especially since my local football team is currently embroiled in a debate about this very issue. Hypothetically, let's say you wanted me to shut up about race - I don't actually talk about it that much, but I'll stand in for people who do. Here's a guide to whether or not this is an appropriate topic to broach.

Ask yourself two questions:

1) Are you the same race as I am, in whole or in part? 

2) Can we both agree that you have made a sincere effort to understand where I'm coming from on these topics?

If the answer to both of those questions is no, then guess what: NOT YOUR CALL.)

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